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Mayor Jean Stothert | City of Omaha

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(May 10, 2019)

Neighborhood art projects, landscaping, community gardens and National Night Out activities will be funded with grants awarded by Mayor Jean Stothert.

29 community and neighborhood organizations received grants for a total of 75-thousand dollars.

Eleven mini-grants will also support National Night Out parties in August.

“This grants program creates important partnerships with our neighborhoods and that’s why I like to recognize good projects with Mayor’s Neighborhood Grants, said Mayor Stothert. “Our city is better because of the hard work of dedicated neighbors.” 

Neighborhood grants are awarded each Spring to qualifying organizations. This year, 41 grant applications were received.

Applications are reviewed by a committee and recommended to the Mayor. The committee includes representatives from the Planning, Parks, Public Works, Police and Fire Departments , Keep Omaha Beautiful and One Omaha.

GRANT RECIPIENTS

 

AKSARBEN-ELMWOOD PARK - $1,886

Park benches for Schroeder-Vogel Park

National Night Out grant for game prizes and yard signs $200

 

ARMBRUST ACRES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION - $1,400

Neighborhood Beautification Day-planting trees at the neighborhood entrance

 

BEMIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $2,750

Neighborhood landscaping and beautification: seeds, tools, landscape design, water tank, mulch, soil

 

BENSON FIRST FRIDAY - $3,750

2019 Public Arts Initiative; banner design and youth art project costs

 

BENSON NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION -$4,730

Furnishings for a children’s nook at Benson Library

 

BIG MUDDY URBAN FARMS - $3,964

Marketing campaign to increase participation in the Gifford Park Neighborhood Market

 

CITY SPROUTS - $5,000

Summer youth internship program

 

DAHLMAN GARDEN CLUB - $582

Supplies and tools for the neighborhood garden

 

ELKHORN STATION MAIN STREET - $4,964

Hanging flower baskets for the Olde Town Elkhorn Business District

National Night Out grant for posters and yard signs $200

 

ELMWOOD PARK NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $600

Gardening on the median at 69th and Dodge

 

ESCALANTE HILLS - $4,900

Trees and mulch for the neighborhood common area

National Night Out grant for party equipment $200

 

GIFFORD PARK NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $5,000

Supplies and promotional items for neighborhood events including Porchfest OMA, Halloween and  holiday banquet events

 

GLOBAL LEADERSHIP GROUP - $5,000

Installation of a pergola at the community garden

 

HANSCOM PARK NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $1,897

Equipment and supplies for 2nd annual CenterFest

 

HIGHLAND SOUTH-INDIAN HILLS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $4,992

South Omaha Back to School Bash

 

HIGHLANDER NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION -$1,100

Supplies and activities for Highlander Community Day

National Night Out grant for back-to-school book bags  $200

 

IN-COMMON COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT - $4,467

A “Block Party Kit” mobile trailer stocked with supplies for interactive block parties

National Night Out grant for promotional supplies  $100

 

LEAVENWORTH NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $1,800

Neighborhood shredding event

 

METCALFE-HARRISON NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $5,000

Infant and toddler swings for Metcalfe Park

 

MORTON MEADOWS COMMUNITY GARDEN - $1,891

Community Garden covered picnic area and rain water collection system

National Night Out grant for children’s games $100

 

PARKER ACTION ALLIANCE - $2,807

Rededication and beautification of Parker Street from 24th Street to 35th, including a free library, neighborhood cleanup material, and landscaping

 

PIEDMONT-WYCLIFFE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $332

Equipment for the citizen patrol

 

SOUTH 13TH STREET COMMUNITY ACTION GROUP - $1,388

Materials for a 12-week demonstration of uses for vacant lots and green spaces in the neighborhood

 

THE UNION FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS - $5,000

The North Omaha Mural Project

 

PACIFIC HEIGHTS-SHAKER HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $200

National Night Out grant for equipment and supplies

 

PEPPERWOOD NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $180

National Night Out grant for scavenger hunt supplies, prizes and toys

 

QUARTERS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $200

National Night Out equipment

 

SUNNY SLOPE-SUNNY VIEW NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $200

National Night Out equipment and supplies

 

WILLOW WOOD NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION - $200

National Night Out equipment rental

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(May 9, 2019)

Mayor Jean Stothert will propose an annexation package that will increase the city’s population and tax base.

After the annual evaluation of the City’s 132 SIDs, the financial analysis shows four SIDs and two adjacent areas are good candidates for annexation.

Mayor Stothert’s 2019 annexation goals are consistent with previous years; the City’s ability to provide police and fire protection, eliminate islands that are already surrounded by the city, and annexation must be revenue positive for the city over the next ten years.

The City’s population will increase by approximately 955 based on 2010 Census data.

After annexation, property taxes in the four SIDs will decrease. The average reduction is $475 per $100,000 valuation.  

 Over the next ten years, projections show the City will collect an estimated $9.6 million in revenue:

  • $8,456,976 property tax revenue
  • $187,872 sales tax
  • $252,000  wheel tax
  • $782,000  street and highway funds    

The City will pay off $3.4 million in debt owed by the SIDs, and the approximate cost of city services is $4.9 million.  After expenses, the actual revenue is approximately $2.3 million.

 “Omaha must continue to grow and remain competitive as one of the largest Midwest cities,” said Mayor Stothert. “Continued, managed growth is important to attract new business and jobs. It has a positive impact on our bond ratings, and the additional revenue allows us to continue investing in our top priorities, public safety and street repair and improvements.” 

The Omaha Fire Department already provides fire protection and emergency medical service to all SIDs and adjacent areas and the volume of 911 calls is low. Police Chief Todd Schmaderer and Fire Chief Dan Olsen have both approved the annexation package.

There are no unimproved streets in any of the SIDs. One property owner has greenbelt status.

Home and business owners are receiving annexation information in the mail this week.

The proposal now goes to the Omaha Planning Board and City Council for approval.

The Planning Board will consider the package on June 5, it will go to the City Council for first reading on June 18. The public hearing is scheduled June 25. 

If passed, the annexation will be effective July 31.

An Open House for residents and business owners will be held Thursday May 23, 5:30-7:00 p.m. at Saddlebrook Community Center, 14850 Laurel Avenue. Mayor Stothert will provide an overview of the annexation package.  City departments will present information and answer questions.

The proposed SIDs to be annexed are all within City Council Districts 6 and 7.  

Stone Creek Plaza                                                   SID 443

The Willows and adjacent areas                              SID 496

Ranch View Estates and adjacent areas                 SID 467                              

Ranch View Estates 3                                              SID 556

(April 29, 2018)

The popular summer concert at Memorial Park has been revived, thanks to the generosity of anonymous private donors.

The City of Omaha Celebrates America concert will take place on Friday, June 28, with performers beginning at 6:00pm, and a larger than ever fireworks display following the show.

Following the recent announcement that the 2019 event would be cancelled, anonymous private donors contacted Mayor Jean Stothert offering to work with the Mayor to ensure that the show will go on.

“We are thrilled that the City of Omaha can step in so this tradition will continue this year. I am very grateful to the donors, and to our Parks Department and Parks Foundation that will make the 2019 concert an evening of family fun and great entertainment,” said Mayor Jean Stothert.

The 2019 concert, produced for the first time by the City of Omaha and sponsored by the Omaha Parks Foundation, will feature local favorite The Firm as an opening act, and national act Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul as the headliner. An additional national act will be added soon.

Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul features lead singer Steven Van Zandt, a founding member of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. The Omaha World-Herald called Little Steven’s November 2018 show at the Holland Performing Arts Center “one of the year’s best concerts.” In 2017, he released his first new album in over 15 years entitled “Soulfire,” which was named one of Rolling Stone’s “Best Albums of 2017.” This May, Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul will release “Summer of Sorcery,” his first album of all original material in 20 years.

The City of Omaha will also partner with Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation during the concert to raise money for its Disaster Relief Fund, which provides aid to Nebraska farmers, ranchers, and rural communities affected by recent storms and flooding. Concertgoers will have opportunities to text-to-give during the event, or to give by check or credit card at a Nebraska Farm Bureau information booth. All donations will be distributed to Nebraskans in need.

“The need is immense,” said Nebraska Farm Bureau President Steve Nelson. “One-point-four billion dollars of loss has taken place. We’re there to help with emergency needs.”

“The concert provides an opportunity for our great, giving Omaha community to make a positive difference to help those affected by the flooding throughout our state,” said Mayor Stothert.

As in years past, the concert will be free to the public and family-friendly. Music will kick off at 6:00pm, and a special, enhanced fireworks display will follow the show, set to a soundtrack provided by Radio Partner CD 105.9. The event will be professionally managed by local firm Vic Gutman & Associates. For more information, visit http://memorialparkconcert.com.  Donations to flood relief can be made on this website.

(April 26, 2019)

Two high traffic roads have reopened after emergency reconstruction.

On March 10th, Mayor Jean Stothert directed the Public Works Department to close 144th Street between “U” and “Q” due to extreme concrete damage. The damaged concrete was removed and the road has been completely rebuilt.

Concrete repairs have also been completed on several roads surrounding Westroads including the southbound lanes under the Dodge Street bridge.  Additional work continues around the mall.

In addition, several street resurfacing projects are underway at these locations: (These are projects funded in 2018, but not completed before winter weather)

Pacific Street: 78th to 84th

Leavenworth: 36th to 45th

36th & Hamilton Area

35th & Gold Area

32nd Avenue: Hascall to Gold

 

APRIL 19-26

REPORTED POTHOLES:  2,233

POTHOLES REPAIRED:   6,301

ASPHALT USED:  883 TONS

 

APRIL 12-18

REPORTED POTHOLES:  3,191

POTHOLES REPAIRED:   6,177

ASPHALT USED:    867 TONS

 

APRIL 5-11

REPORTED POTHOLES: 3,175*

POTHOLES REPAIRED:   6,020

ASPHALT USED:   843 TONS

 

MARCH 29-APRIL 4

REPORTED POTHOLES: 5,772*

POTHOLES REPAIRED: 7,445 

ASPHALT USED:  1,044 TONS

 

MARCH 18-27

REPORTED POTHOLES: 7,407*

POTHOLES REPAIRED: 5,550

ASPHALT USED:  775 TONS

*This includes every reported location, even locations reported multiple times, so the actual number is  lower.

The repair estimate is based on the amount of asphalt used and the average size of repaired potholes (3’ x 3’ x 8” deep).  We are using this estimate because pothole reports are bundled into work orders for scheduled repairs.  A work order can be one pothole, or a street with multiple potholes, so this estimate is the most accurate number.

During the week April 19 - April 26 we worked at these locations repairing potholes with asphalt.  Work at some of these locations is ongoing.

AMES:   60th to 72ND

BABE GOMEZ: “R” to “Z”

BLONDO: 90TH TO 144TH

DAVENPORT: 48TH TO 50TH

DAVENPORT: 117TH TO 120TH

DEWEY AVENUE: PARK AVENUE TO TURNER BLVD

DODGE STREET: 28TH TO 29TH (BRIDGE JOINTS)

ELKHORN DRIVE: MAIN STREET TO WEST MAPLE

GRAND AVENUE: 48TH TO 50TH

“I” STREET: 102ND TO 132ND

JJ PERSHING DRIVE: 9TH TO 16TH

“L” STREET: 120TH TO 132ND

LARIMORE AVENUE: 42ND TO 48TH

 “M” STREET: 108TH TO 114TH

MARTIN AVENUE: MINNE LUSA TO 30TH

MILITARY AVE: 72ND TO 78TH

REGENCY PKWY: PACIFIC TO DODGE (including ramps at Dodge)

ROLLING RIDGE DRIVE: 156TH TO 168TH

SADDLE CREEK & CUMING

WEST MAPLE ROAD: 204TH TO ELKHORN DRIVE

WESTROADS LOOP

WESTWOOD LANE: PEDERSEN DRIVE TO 122ND

WYCLIFFE DRIVE/PIEDMONT

36TH STREET: MORMON TO CRAIG 

42ND STREET: GROVER TO I-80

42ND STREET: HARRISON TO “R”

52ND STREET: AMES TO NORTHWEST RADIAL

52nd STREET: BEFORD TO SPAULDING

60th STREET: AMES TO NW RADIAL

61ST STREET: CHICAGO TO UNDERWOOD

66TH STREET: WESTERN TO UNDERWOOD

72ND STREET: CROWN POINT TO STATE

72ND STREET: IZARD TO FARNAM

72ND & ”J”

80TH STREET: HICKORY TO SHIRLEY

84TH STREET: MARTHA TO RIDGEWOOD

90TH STREET: MAPLEWOOD TO FORT

108TH STREET: FOWLER TO FORT

120TH STREET: FRANKLIN TO BLONDO

120TH STREET: “L” to CENTER

132ND STREET:  MAPLE TO BLONDO

154TH STREET & 152ND STREET SOUTH OF WYCLIFFE

156TH STREET:  BLONDO TO DODGE

156TH STREET: SUMMERWOOD TO STONEYBROOK

168TH STREET:  OAK TO CENTER

 

We request citizens make pothole reports to the Mayor’s Hotline 402-444-5555, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or omahahotline.com rather than social media sites so reports can be promptly reported to the Street Maintenance Division for repair.

   

(April 23, 2019)

Musician.  Entertainment Promoter. Licensed Real Estate Broker.  Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Member. Zoning Board of Appeals Member.  Omaha/Douglas County Building Commission Member. Omaha City Council member.  Interim Mayor. Father. Husband. 

That’s the resume of Subby Anzaldo.

At the request of Mayor Jean Stothert, the Omaha City Council approved adding Anzaldo’s name to the Columbus Park Community Center, to recognize his service to the City of Omaha. The Center will be renamed “Subby Anzaldo Columbus Park Community Center”.

Anzaldo served on the Omaha City Council from 1988-1994 and 1997-2000, representing the South Omaha District 3.  In 2000, he became an advisor to Mayor Hal Daub and later served as interim Mayor from 1994-1995.

“Subby has served our city for three decades, and I am proud to honor his service with a commemorative renaming of the community center in the City Council district he represented so well,” said Mayor Stothert.  “He has been a lifelong advocate for South Omaha.”

“Next to my family, my proudest days have been serving my fellow citizens of this great city,” said Anzaldo. “My thanks and gratitude extend to Mayor Stothert, District 3 City Councilman Chris Jerram, members of the City Council past and present, Parks & Recreation Director Brook Bench, former Mayor Hal Daub and everyone whom I’ve worked with during my time as an elected and appointed official in Omaha city government."

Councilmembers Chris Jerram and Brinker Harding thanked Anzaldo for being a role model and mentor to others.  “I learned a lot from Subby. This is amazing recognition for a man who loves his community so much,” said Councilman Harding.

The Anzaldo family attended the City Council meeting Tuesday to thank Mayor Stothert and the Council for the recognition.  “The Subby Anzaldo Columbus Community Center is in the heart of our South Omaha neighborhood. This honor and dedication is one of pride and joy for our family on behalf of the legacy of our husband & father,” said the family.

(April 12, 2019)

Over the past seven days (April 4-11), the number of pothole repairs far exceeded  the number of new pothole reports. New reports are consistently declining.

While main, high-traffic streets and intersections remain the priority, city and contractor crews are also now working  on residential neighborhoods.

We request citizens make pothole reports to the Mayor’s Hotline 402-444-5555, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or omahahotline.com rather than social media sites so reports can be promptly reported to the Street Maintenance Division for repair.

 

APRIL 5-11

REPORTED POTHOLES: 3,175*

POTHOLES REPAIRED:   6,020

ASPHALT USED:   843 TONS

MARCH 29-APRIL 4

REPORTED POTHOLES: 5,772*

POTHOLES REPAIRED: 7,445 

ASPHALT USED:  1,044 TONS

MARCH 18-27

REPORTED POTHOLES: 7,407*

POTHOLES REPAIRED: 5,550

ASPHALT USED:  775 TONS

*This includes every reported location, even locations reported multiple times, so the actual number is much lower.

The repair estimate is based on the amount of asphalt used and the average size of repaired potholes (3’ x 3’ x 8” deep).

We are using this estimate because pothole reports are bundled into work orders for scheduled repairs.  A work order can be one pothole, or a street with multiple potholes, so this estimate is the most accurate number.

During the week April 5-April 11 we worked at these locations: 

BLAIR HIGH ROAD: CROWN POINT TO 78TH

BLONDO: 50TH TO 52ND

CHICAGO STREET: 22ND TO 24TH

CROWN POINT: WENNINGHOFF TO 72ND

CUMING: RIVERFRONT DRIVE TO 30TH

DAVENPORT: 22ND TO 24TH

“F” STREET: 72ND TO 84TH

GROVER: 60TH TO 72ND

HARNEY: 11TH TO 19TH

HARNEY: 40TH TO TURNER BLVD

HARRISON: 30TH TO 60TH

JACKSON STREET: 16TH TO 19TH  

“L” STREET: 42ND TO 60TH

“L” STREET: 120TH TO 132ND (INTERSECTIONS)

McKINLEY: 30TH TO 36TH

PACIFIC STREET: APPLIED PARKWAY TO 168TH

RIVERFRONT DRIVE

SPRING STREET: 54TH TO 60TH

ST. MARY’S AVENUE: 25TH to 28TH

UNDERWOOD: 52ND TO 72ND

VINTON STREET: DEER PARK TO 24TH

WEST MAPLE ROAD: 144TH TO 156TH AND 192 TO ELKHORN DRIVE

*Also this week the NE Department of Transportation started its West Maple resurfacing project.  For more information: https://dot.nebraska.gov/media/13177/moving-the-metro-2019.pdf

WESTROADS LOOP

WESTWOOD LANE: 120TH TO 132ND

WRIGHT STREET: 181ST TO 186TH

11TH STREET: NICHOLAS TO AVENUE “H”

13TH STREET: “J” TO “D”

15TH STREET: FARNAM TO CAPITOL

16TH STREET: JONES TO HOWARD

16TH STREET: CUMING TO CAPITOL

19TH STREET: HARNEY TO FARNAM

24TH STREET: MARTHA TO VINTON  

24TH STREET: VINTON TO “L”

24th STREET: FORT TO AMES

30TH STREET:  AMES TO SORENSEN

30TH STREET: STATE TO MARTIN

33rd STREET: CALIFORNIA TO BURT

36th STREET: AMES TO PAXTON

36TH STREET: FARNAM TO DEWEY

42ND STREET:  AMES TO SPRAGUE

45TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO CENTER 

52ND STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO CENTER

60TH STREET: LAUREL TO BROWNE

84th STREET: “L” TO “F”

90TH STREET: MAPLEWOOD TO FORT

90TH STREET: WESTERN TO FORT

120TH STREET:  CENTER TO “L”

132ND STREET:  MAPLE TO EAGLE RUN

136TH & MADISON

144TH STREET: INDUSTRIAL TO “Q”

168TH STREET:  OAK TO CENTER

168TH STREET: BURKE TO JACKSON

180TH STREET: “F” TO ”Q”

   

(April 9, 2019)

Mayor Jean Stothert has asked the Omaha City Council to approve a contract that will change and modernize Omaha’s solid waste collection system and will not require a tax increase to pay for the higher annual cost.

“This contract will impact every Omaha taxpayer for the next 10-20 years,” said Mayor Stothert.  “I have made a recommendation that provides solid waste, yard waste and recycling services at a price we can afford.”

The Mayor asked the Council to approve a contract with FCC Environmental for a two-cart system, one cart for weekly co-mingled yard waste and solid waste and a second for biweekly recycling.  96-gallon carts will be distributed to all homes, with an option to downsize to a 48-gallon cart after a trial period.

“We can implement this contract without a tax increase,” said Mayor Stothert.  

The FCC bid is the lowest and best value for the taxpayers. FCC is a worldwide company and has the required experience and resources to deliver the required services.  Communities including Houston, Dallas, and Palm Beach County, Florida contract with FCC for waste collection services.

SUMMARY OF COSTS:

The 2019 budgeted cost for solid waste collection is $14,900,000. The current contract was approved in 2006 and expires December 31, 2020. There is no option for renewal.

FCC BID BREAKDOWN:

2-CART CO-MINGLED WEEKLY TRASH AND YARD WASTE COLLECTION & BIWEEKLY RECYCLING

$22,691,046 annually

$7.7 million increase (52%) over current cost

Over the 10-year contract the total cost will be $226,910,460, which includes the cost of carts and the spring and fall cleanups

3-CART CO-MINGLED TRASH AND YARD WASTE COLLECTION & BIWEEKLY RECYCLING

$25,714,820

$10.8 million increase (72%) over current cost

The 10-year cost of a 3-cart co-mingled system is $257,148,196

3-CART SYSTEM SEPARATE COLLECTION OF YARD WASTE, SOLID WASTE AND RECYCLING$28,647,320

$13.7 million increase (92%)

The 10-year cost of a 3-cart separate collection is $286,473,196

The evaluation of the other bids shows the following:

West Central Sanitation submitted the lowest bid. The company does not have experience with a contract of this size.  The bid review committee expressed low confidence in West Central Sanitation’s ability to be successful with this contract.

Waste Connection of Nebraska and Waste Management submitted bids substantially higher than FCC Environmental.

"The cost of this new contract will be substantial but it will not be necessary to cut other services to pay for the contract we are recommending," said Mayor Stothert. 

The Mayor’s recommendation follows three years of study, public outreach, telephone surveys, equipment demonstrations, City Council input, a pilot program to test automated collection, and a competitive Request for Bids.  

Bid documents required all interested companies to bid on a collection system that uses automatic trucks and covered carts to collect garbage, recyclables, and yard waste.  Bidders provided costs for six options including a 3-cart system, 2-cart system, separate yard waste collection, yard waste and solid waste co-mingled, weekly and bi-weekly recycling collection.

The Request for Bids was released in October, four bids were received in January. The bids have been reviewed by the Public Works General Services Division, Law and Human Rights and Relations Departments, SCS Engineers and the working group named to complete the evaluation.  

A 2016 telephone survey conducted for the City of Omaha by SCS Engineers shows this option will meet the needs of the majority of residents.

A variety of free and low-cost additional services will be offered for yard waste collection that exceeds the basic service.

Citizens can request and pay for additional carts from FCC Environmental for $1.75 per week

($45.50 for biweekly recycling and $91.00 for weekly solid waste for the entire year).  FCC will also offer a sticker program for curbside collection of yard waste bags for $1.98 per bag.

Citizens can take yard waste directly to the Oma-Gro facility for no charge, yard waste will be accepted at no charge during the spring and fall cleanups.

In addition to the capabilities of FCC Environmental and their cost-effective bid, FCC will also have a fleet of CNG trucks ready on the first day of service.

"It's different, it's change. Change is not easy, we understand that. It will take time to get used to a new system," said Mayor Stothert.

The recommended contract is expected to be on the City Council agenda for first reading on April 16.  A public hearing will be held on April 23, a vote is possible April 30.

 

PREVIOUS STORIES ABOUT THE COLLECTION CONTRACT SELECTION:

https://mayors-office.cityofomaha.org/city-news/376-xxx

https://mayors-office.cityofomaha.org/city-news/362-city-seeks-bids-for-next-solid-waste-collection-contract

https://mayors-office.cityofomaha.org/city-news/256-mayor-announces-pilot-program-to-test-alternate-trash-collection

https://www.cityofomaha.org/latest-news/379-study-measures-economic-environmental-aspects-of-yard-waste-collection-and-disposal

(April 5, 2019)

Since our first pothole repair report on March 29, we continue to make significant progress on repairs.  Over the past seven days (March 29-April 4), the number of pothole reports declined, and the number of repairs increased.  This is going in the right direction.   Several factors are helping us make rapid repairs:  we paid Omni $4,000 to open its asphalt plant on March 18, three weeks early, so we can buy hot asphalt, the number of private contractor crews is consistently 9-10 each day, and we had only one rainy day this week that affected the work schedule.

 

MARCH 29-APRIL 4

REPORTED POTHOLES: 5,772*

POTHOLES REPAIRED: 7,445 

ASPHALT USED:  1,044 TONS

 

MARCH 18-27

REPORTED POTHOLES: 7,407*

POTHOLES REPAIRED: 5,550

ASPHALT USED:  775 TONS

*This includes every reported location, even locations reported multiple times, so the actual number is much lower.

 

The repair estimate is based on the amount of asphalt used and the average size of repaired potholes (3’ x 3’ x 8” deep).

We are using this estimate because pothole reports are bundled into work orders for scheduled repairs.  A work order can be one pothole, or a street with multiple potholes, so this estimate is the most accurate number.

Pothole reports should be made to the Mayor’s Hotline 402-444-5555, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or omahahotline.com.

Thank you to our Street Maintenance staff.  These employees are making a difference and their tireless work is appreciated.

This week, we also determined our preliminary expenses for the first quarter of 2019 for street maintenance services which includes snow and ice removal and street repairs. We have spent approximately $1 million in employee overtime, $2.5 million for private contractors that plowed snow, and $2.5 million in salt (January-March). 

During the week March 29-April 4, we worked at these locations: 

BEDFORD AVE: 30TH TO JOHN CREIGHTON 

BLACKWELL DRIVE: STONY BROOK TO “Q”

BLAIR HIGH ROAD

CALIFORNIA: 98TH TO 102ND

CENTER: 32ND TO 36TH

CENTER: 42ND TO 84TH 

FARNAM STREET: 8TH TO 10TH

FARNAM STREET: 120TH TO BURKE BLVD

FONTENELLE BLVD:  RADIAL HIGHWAY TO AMES

FORT STREET: FONTENELLE TO 52ND

GROVER: 60TH TO 72ND

HAPPY HOLLOW BLVD

INDIAN HILLS: 84TH TO 90TH

“F” STREET: 132ND TO 138TH 

JACKSON STREET: 16TH TO 19TH  

“L” STREET: 42ND TO 60TH

MAPLE: 45TH TO 52ND

MERCY ROAD: 67TH TO 78TH

MILITARY: 99TH TO 108TH

MISSOURI AVENUE: 13TH TO 20TH

PACIFIC STREET: 72ND TO BEVERLY DRIVE

PACIFIC STREET:  153RD TO BOB BOOZER

PACIFIC STREET: BOB BOOZER TO APPLIED PARKWAY

PACIFIC STREET: APPLIED PARKWAY TO 156TH

PARK AVE: LEAVENWORTH TO WOOLWORTH

RIVERFRONT DRIVE

ROSE BLUMKIN DRIVE 

ROUNDUP ROAD/SKYLINE PASS

“Q” STREET: 36TH TO 38TH

SADDLE CREEK: DODGE TO LEAVENWORTH

  1. MARY’S AVENUE AT 25TH

STORZ EXPRESSWAY

SORENSEN PARKWAY

WEST DODGE FRONTAGE ROAD-WEST OF 156TH

WEST MAPLE ROAD: 144TH TO 204th

WESTERN: 52ND TO 84TH

13th STREET: VINTON TO INTERSTATE 80

20TH STREET: BURT TO CASS

22ND STREET: LOCUS TO PINKNEY

24TH STREET: MARTHA TO VINTON  

24th STREET FRANKLIN TO CUMING

30TH STREET:  LAKE TO CUMING

30TH STREET: CUMING TO CHICAGO

36TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO CENTER

40TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO MARCY

42ND & FONTENELLE 

42ND STREET:  FONTENELLE TO REDMAN

42nd STREET: SOPRENSEN TO NEWPORT

45TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO CENTER 

52ND STREET: MIAMI TO AMES

52ND STREET: WESTERN TO DODGE

60TH STREET: LAUREL TO BROWNE

60TH STREET: MAPLE TO CORBY

69TH STREET: WESTERN TO DODGE

72ND STREET:  MERCY TO “F”

72ND STREET: SORENSEN TO AMES

72ND STREET: INTERSTATE 680 TO LAKE CUNNINGHAM DRIVE

78TH STREET: BLAIR HIGH TO CROWN POINT

90TH STREET:  FORT TO MAPLEWOOD

90TH STREET: INDIAN HILLS TO PACIFIC  

90TH STREET: MAPLEWOOD TO BLAIR HIGH

120TH STREET:  CENTER TO “L”

132ND STREET:  DODGE TO MAPLE

138TH STREET: Q TO HARRISON

144TH STREET: INDUSTRIAL TO “Q”

157TH & PACIFIC

168TH STREET:  “H” TO CENTER

168TH STREET: PACIFIC TO HARRISON

180TH STREET AT FRANCES

180TH STREET AT SHADOW RIDGE DRIVE

Next week, April 8-12 is National Work Zone Awareness Week.  This is the 20th anniversary of the event. The goals of the annual campaign are to promote safety as the spring road construction season begins and raise awareness for caution while driving through work zones to decrease fatalities and injuries.

In 2017, Omaha Public Works employee Sal Fidone was hit and killed while working on a pothole repair crew.  Last week, an employee of B & W Company, a city contractor, was seriously injured when a driver hit a pickup truck carrying flashing arrow warning signs. The impact pinned the employee against the equipment. 

We urge all drivers to use caution when driving though work zones.

The attached Public Service Announcement was produced in 2017 following Mr. Fidone’s death and is available for use on your websites and social media.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1CtBwAYKRezzwb1qRkCONOosA157yF5Hg/view

(April 2, 2019)

Waste Management will begin limited separate yard waste collection this week.

All yard waste will be temporarily delivered to the Douglas County Landfill until access to the Oma-Gro compost facility at the City of Omaha Papillion Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is restored.  Roads to the plant remain closed after the flood. 

Waste Management has notified the City it will not be able to fulfill the contractual requirement for separate collections citywide but will collect yard waste separately in neighborhoods between 72nd Street and Interstate 680. The City’s monthly payments to Waste Management will be reduced by $49,468.71.

The contract requires separate collections April-November. 

The Papillion Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is still being assessed to determine damage to the property and the compost operation, and establish a timeline for cleanup and reopening. 

The plant and the Oma-Gro facility were also damaged during the June 2017 tornado.

(March 29, 2019)

Every week, we will provide a report on pothole repairs, so you know exactly what we are doing.

In the last 10 days (March 18-27), we received 7,407 pothole reports.  This includes every reported location, even locations reported multiple times, so the actual number is much lower.

In the same 10-day period, we estimate we repaired 5,550 potholes.  

How did we come up with this number?  The estimate is based on the amount of asphalt used (775 tons) and the average size of repaired potholes (3’ x 3’ x 8” deep).

We are using this estimate because pothole reports are bundled into work orders for scheduled repairs.  A work order can be one pothole, or a street with multiple potholes, so this estimate is the most accurate number.

It is a monumental task to repair the roads damaged over the winter, but our employees are working hard and catching up, and we ask again that drivers be aware of work zones and the safety of our employees and our contractor’s employees as they do their jobs.

This week, 22 city crews and between 6-10 contractor crews worked on pothole repair daily.  We also worked on Saturday March 23RD and will work tomorrow March 30.

We realize that many of our streets are old and have been neglected for about 50 years.  

Several years ago, we completed an analysis of our streets and determined that to improve all 5,000 lane miles to today’s standards, it would cost $800-$900 million. 

The city receives approximately $20 million annually from the wheel tax you pay, and $40 million from the state gas tax. By law, this money must be spent on roads and road-related expenses, so you can see our needs are much greater than our resources. 

2019 City of Omaha budget: https://finance.cityofomaha.org/ndex.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=43:2019-adopted-budget&catid=9:adopted)

We do have a plan, however.

For the past five years, we have put a historic amount of money into street resurfacing. In 2018, we had over $18.5 million in street resurfacing projects. This year, we have 69 resurfacing projects planned.  This compares to just $5 million back in 2012. We also have $320 million in our Capital Improvement Plan. (CIP).for road projects over the next six years.

You can review the CIP at this link; https://planning.cityofomaha.org/images/stories/CIP/2019-2024-CIP_FINAL_ForWeb.pdf

Right now, our priority has been to complete pothole repairs on major streets. 

The average time for repairs, from the date of the report to the repair currently ranges from 8—10 days.

Since March 18, we have prioritized these locations: 

ABBOTT DRIVE

BEDFORD AVE: 30TH TO JOHN CREIGHTON

BLAIR HIGH ROAD

BLONDO STREET:  67TH TO 132ND 

BURKE BLVD: 120TH TO WEST DODGE FRONTAGE ROAD

CENTER: 42ND TO 84TH

DODGE STREET:  72ND TO 78TH

FARNAM STREET: HAPPY HOLLOW TO SADDLE CREEK

FONTENELLE BLVD:  RADIAL HIGHWAY TO AMES

HARRISON STREET: 60TH TO 72ND

“F” STREET: 132ND TO 138TH

“I” STREET: 120TH TO 132ND

“L” STREET:  108TH TO 132ND

LAKE STREET:  16TH TO 30TH

MARTIN AVENUE:  30TH STREET TO BELVEDERE BLVD

PACIFIC STREET:  153RD TO BOB BOOZER

PACIFIC STREET: BOB BOOZER TO APPLIED PARKWAY

PARK AVE: LEAVENWORTH TO ST MARY'S

STORZ EXPRESSWAY

SORENSEN PARKWAY:  30TH TO 72ND

WEST MAPLE ROAD: 144TH TO 204TH

24TH STREET: MARTHA TO “F”

30TH STREET:  LAKE TO CUMING

36TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO CENTER

40TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO MARCY

42ND & FONTENELLE

42ND STREET:  REDMAN TO NEWPORT

45TH STREET: LEAVENWORTH TO CENTER

60TH STREET: LAUREL TO BROWNE

68TH STREET: PACIFIC TO CENTER

72ND STREET:  DODGE TO “F”

78TH STREET:  CENTER TO PACIFIC

80TH & FRANCES

84TH STREET: “L” TO CENTER

90TH STREET:  MAPLE TO FORT

90TH STREET: INDIAN HILLS TO PACIFIC

90TH STREET: MAPLEWOOD TO BLAIR HIGH

120TH STREET:  CENTER TO “L”

132ND & CENTER INTERSECTION

132ND STREET:  PACIFIC TO CENTER

132ND STREET:  DODGE TO MAPLE